Men Who Want Their Life Back

A Partner’s Guide to Erectile Dysfunction

A Partner’s Guide to Erectile Dysfunction

By Marianne Wait

 

Anne, 63, of Medford, OR, knows a thing or two about erectile dysfunction (ED). Her husband, now 58, first started taking medication for it about 5 years ago.

“At first you think, oh, you’re getting older and slowing down. But it got to the point where it was really bothering him, and he was unable to have sex without the drugs,” says Anne, who asked that we use her middle name only.

He is far from alone. Some 18% of all men in the U.S. have ED, and the odds of developing it increase sharply after age 40.

People who have diabetes, as Anne’s husband does, are three times more likely to have ED than men who don’t have diabetes. The disease can damage the blood vessels and nerves needed for an erection.

Having a partner with ED can be difficult to deal with, but think of it from his perspective. “We as women cannot even imagine how frustrating it is for them — at least, that’s what my husband tells me,” says Anne.

Although it can feel personal, you shouldn’t blame yourself for your partner’s erectile dysfunction. It usually has a combination of causes — and, experts say, you probably are not one of them.

“It’s pretty rare for the source of ED to be the person that he’s having sex with,” explains sex and relationship expert Ian Kerner, PhD.

“Some women will feel like, ‘He’s not attracted to me, he’s not into me, or he’s bored by me.’ And that’s really relatively rare compared to the other more likely factors.”

In older men, blood vessel problems tend to be the main reason for ED. In fact, since the blood vessels in the penis are smaller than those in the heart, heart disease may show up in the penis first. Eighty percent of men who land in the ER with a first heart attack say they developed ED at some point in the 3 years before, says Daniel Shoskes, MD. He is a professor of urology at Cleveland Clinic.

Medications, especially beta-blockers for high blood pressure and certain antidepressants, also can lead to erection problems.

If your partner’s problem is low testosterone (symptoms include lack of sex drive and very low energy), testosterone therapy can lead to “dramatic improvement,” says Shoskes.

(Help for both medical conditions noted above – erectile dysfunction and Low Testosterone – is just a phone call away. Call us at 888-333-3338 today!)

The message will be closed after 20 s
Call Now!